Our awesome two-part TV segment on the “Traveling West Virginia” series by Brad Rice

If you haven’t seen our sweet TV debut yet, it’s now on YouTube. This originally aired a few weeks back on Eyewitness News in WCHS and WVAH on Charleston and Huntington, West Virginia during their weekly “Traveling West Virginia” segment by photojournalist Brad Rice. Part 1 is about “Scavengeology” as a new field of science, …

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What does it really mean when you start finding little white dead baby dolls buried underground?

When I first pulled this creepy white dead baby figurine from the backyard trash pit of a 19th century log cabin, it was pretty creepy – especially for my 9 year old daughter, who was assisting me at the time. Even the dog seemed to think I was a goner at that point. Here’s the …

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The first “Thanksgiving” in America was in Virginia – and it’s in December

Most of us who are interested in Virginia history know that Virginia’s Jamestown settlement preceded the Pilgrims landing at Plymouth Rock, but do we also know that the Jamestown settlers celebrated their own “Thanksgiving” in 1619 – before the Pilgrims arrived? Today would not be Thanksgiving if Virginia history got its due. Americans would be …

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Relic Revolvers found in Montana, the Ohio River, and at the site of a Civil War battle

Here is a set of three different revolvers, in relic condition, which have been scavenged from the ground in some pretty interesting places. This first one is a Colt Single Action Army, which was dug in Montana, about 13 miles from the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn, where Custer and his army were …

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Biscayne Trade Axes: the earliest known metal axes in North America

As early as 1608, John Smith, of the English Jamestown settlement, discovered that some natives around coastal Virginia were already armed with French metal axes. The Tockwoghes, the tribe in possession of the axes, testified that they had obtained the implements from the Isquesahanocks. Smith visited this tribe also and was informed that their iron …

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Native American “Scalping Knives” – the truth, the fiction, the business, the bloody history

Lately I’ve had a thing for Native American trade knives, commonly referred to as scalping knives – or scalper blade knives. They were all-purpose and could have been used for everything from butchering, to of-course, scalping enemies. In my own research, I’ve found that there’s not a whole lot out there on these knives – …

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The SCAVENGEOLOGY JOURNAL – Volume 1 – “Discovering Byrnside’s Fort”

AVAILABLE NOW! 80 color pages of high quality photos of the discoveries, renovations, and explorations at the site of Byrnside’s Fort at Willowbrook Plantation. SCAV-ENG-E-OL-O-GY: The study of history through the excavation of discarded items, exploring people’s attics, flying drones, and stuff. The term “scavengeology” was coined when the author, a major history buff, began metal detecting …

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Exploring the Arbuckle’s Fort Site in Greenbrier County, WV, circa 1774-1782

Arbuckle’s Fort was a Revolutionary-era frontier fort located in Greenbrier County, one of many forts that helped settlers to colonize Western Virginia. The fort stood on the property of John Keeney on a rise of land near the confluence of Mill Creek and Muddy Creek. It was built in the spring of 1774, under order …

Read moreExploring the Arbuckle’s Fort Site in Greenbrier County, WV, circa 1774-1782