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18th century pack saddles, 2 found in Greenbrier County

These are 3 original pack saddles in the 18th century style, 2 of which were found in Greenbrier County, WV. These were used by the early long hunters on the frontier to transport their belongings, which most importantly included their furs, hides, meat, etc. They were also used by the early settlers to bring their belongings to new areas of settlement, to which no roads existed.

Van Schaick 1720 Flintlock Fowler, from the Van Schaick Mansion

This is a Dutch Fowler made by Penterman of Utrecht, Holland, circa 1720, for Anthony Van Schaick, a wealthy merchant, Indian trader and Captain in the New York militia throughout the French and Indian War period. His name is engraved on the barrel. It looks like what is known as a “Hudson Valley Fowler,” however, since it was actually made in Holland, rather than the colony of New York, it isn’t technically a Hudson Valley Fowler. Hudson Valley Fowlers were built in that region, mimicking fowlers from Holland, such as this early example.

Artifacts recovered at Jamestown

Jamestown relics which will hopefully be featured in the Scavengeology Museum…. Pure #Merica. Above all else, I’ve never felt history flow through my veins when holding an object than when holding this sword. What a piece of the past… A little on Jamestown: The Jamestown[1] settlement in the Colony of Virginia was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas. It …

Read moreArtifacts recovered at Jamestown

Iron Artifact found at Byrnside’s Fort Identified: huge trammel for the fort’s cooking fireplace

When I originally found this huge iron object at the fort, I first assumed it was a big forged hinge of some sort, or other architectural hardware. After examining it, it’s not a hinge at all, it’s part of a very large fireplace trammel, which would have been used as an adjustable hanger for kettles for cooking in an open fireplace.

Scavengeology skills ID important-looking bald guy in painting found at yard sale, and it’s a good one….

It was a little easier to read the text once I took a photo of it and manipulated the colors, etc., using photoshop. It appears to read, “State of the Roll, Borough of Greenwich, December 1832.” Then there’s some names, but they’re pretty difficult to read, even after running it through photoshop. So I turned to google with the things I did know: the date of 1832, the “Borough of Greenwich” and some sort of vote or roll call….

18th century shark skin razor case “left” in America by a Scottish Lord in 1772.

In the autumn of 1770, a mysterious stranger appeared in town, who had “a rather remarkable appearance.” The man stopped at Benjamin’s Tavern. He introduced himself as John Sterling, from Edinburgh, Scotland. Locals immediately were suspicious of him, since he appeared as a traveler, and not to be engaged in any worldly or religious business. However, in reality, he was the son of a Scottish Baronet, and had been sent on a trip by his father to tour America and Canada. It doesn’t sound as if he immediately disclosed this fact to the town. However, he was reportedly pleasant and entertaining.