The actual site of Fort Washington – now downtown Cincinnati – circa 1789

If you’ve read the Allen Eckert books, or studied the expansion of the American frontier in the late 1700’s and early 1800’s, then you’ve read about Fort Washington. It was located in an important spot. And because of that, it’s completely gone, with a large city built over it: Cincinnati, Ohio. The large well-constructed log … Read moreThe actual site of Fort Washington – now downtown Cincinnati – circa 1789

Jackpot! Major Samuel Clark’s Sword Found

During our renovations of Willowbrook, removing the plaster on the inside of the original Byrnside’s Fort logs, we found an old dusty envelope with the following words written on it: “Key’s to Major Samuel Clark’s Sword Case.” Inside the envelope were two tiny old keys – both with the same wording. So naturally I began … Read moreJackpot! Major Samuel Clark’s Sword Found

Biscayne Trade Axes: the earliest known metal axes in North America

As early as 1608, John Smith, of the English Jamestown settlement, discovered that some natives around coastal Virginia were already armed with French metal axes. The Tockwoghes, the tribe in possession of the axes, testified that they had obtained the implements from the Isquesahanocks. Smith visited this tribe also and was informed that their iron … Read moreBiscayne Trade Axes: the earliest known metal axes in North America

The flintlock the early Virginia frontiersman likely would have carried.

When the first settlers came into the Greenbrier Valley in the 1750’s, this is likely the type of firearm they brought with them. A civilian owned smoothbore fowler. This longarm is exactly 6 feet in overall length. It has a bore of exactly .70 caliber. It could fire a solid round lead ball. Or it … Read moreThe flintlock the early Virginia frontiersman likely would have carried.

The Site of The Clendenin Massacre on the Big Levels of Greenbrier County – 1763

The Clendenin Massacre, also sometimes referred to as the “Muddy Creek Massacre,” took place in July of 1763 about 2 miles Southwest of what is now Lewisburg, West Virginia (not itself created until 1774). I always wondered why this was referred to as part of the “Muddy Creek Massacre” when Muddy Creek itself is actually … Read moreThe Site of The Clendenin Massacre on the Big Levels of Greenbrier County – 1763

Native American “Scalping Knives” – the truth, the fiction, the business, the bloody history

Lately I’ve had a thing for Native American trade knives, commonly referred to as scalping knives – or scalper blade knives. They were all-purpose and could have been used for everything from butchering, to of-course, scalping enemies. In my own research, I’ve found that there’s not a whole lot out there on these knives – … Read moreNative American “Scalping Knives” – the truth, the fiction, the business, the bloody history

The Homemade Mountain Chairs of Virginia and West Virginia

The Virginia Rural Slat-back chair is the chair of the common man, and particularly special to Virginia (especially what would become West Virginia post 1863). It is unique to the region, and has coasted under the radar through the years of the city-dwellers with the taste for a more refined object to sit upon (though … Read moreThe Homemade Mountain Chairs of Virginia and West Virginia

Native American Fur Trade finds from Michigan

These items were all found by metal detector by Robert Bennett of St. Ignace, Michigan. They were found at early Native American village locations along the shore of Lake Michigan – mostly in the area of Good Hart, Michigan. They are an excellent representation of the types of European goods which were traded to the … Read moreNative American Fur Trade finds from Michigan

The story of Catherine Gougar – early Ohio pioneer

I found this 1922 article on this interesting woman who was an early Ohio settler, who was captured by Indians at one point, and who’s family – at least in 1922 – were still living in the same spot. The formatting is a little screwy, but I’m not taking the time to fix it. BY … Read moreThe story of Catherine Gougar – early Ohio pioneer

18th Century Door from the Richard Hill Cabin in Mill Point, WV

This is the cabin door from the Richard Hill cabin, which stood near Mill Point, West Virginia, in present day Pocahontas County, West Virginia. It was saved by Jim Costa, and is in his collection. Richard Hill is believed to have settled at this spot shortly after the Revolutionary War. The Greenbrier County Personal Property … Read more18th Century Door from the Richard Hill Cabin in Mill Point, WV