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A beautiful historic home in the Greenbrier Valley you never knew was there. The Gwinn Plantation.

Samuel Gwinn is believed to have settled on the Greenbrier River at the same time as his friend James Graham, building a log cabin across the Greenbrier River from Graham, circa 1770. The log cabin is now gone, unlike the Graham cabin, but I did track it down. And there is an old photo of it still standing. Originally this was in Greenbrier County. Then Monroe County…. and finally, Summers County.

Artifacts recovered at Jamestown

Jamestown relics which will hopefully be featured in the Scavengeology Museum…. Pure #Merica. Above all else, I’ve never felt history flow through my veins when holding an object than when holding this sword. What a piece of the past… A little on Jamestown: The Jamestown[1] settlement in the Colony of Virginia was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas. It …

Read moreArtifacts recovered at Jamestown

Gap Mills, West Virginia, by drone, including early 19th century tyrannical toll fees and tax assessments

I shot this footage last fall in 4k, but I never properly processed it. Well here it is. I recently found an old print of “The History of Gap Mills Community,” written by C.C. Ballard, so I threw in a few historical tidbits I thought was interesting. That way, it isn’t a complete waste of time to watch the video, since you will technically learn something.

Iron Artifact found at Byrnside’s Fort Identified: huge trammel for the fort’s cooking fireplace

When I originally found this huge iron object at the fort, I first assumed it was a big forged hinge of some sort, or other architectural hardware. After examining it, it’s not a hinge at all, it’s part of a very large fireplace trammel, which would have been used as an adjustable hanger for kettles for cooking in an open fireplace.