Welcome to SCAVENGEOLOGY

It's all about SAVING HISTORY....

Join us as we learn our history by doing, and by scavenging the discarded items, as well as the important historical items, of our forefathers.  If we don't save our history now, and make an effort to educate ourselves, as well as our children, our soul as a country, and a region, will be lost forever.  And it's fun to play with drones, and metal detectors and stuff......

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Shop the SCAV STORE: T-shirts, Finds - both relics and treasure - and get our book, Vol. 1 of the SCAVENGEOLOGY Journal, with the history behind our discovery and renovation of Byrnside's Fort, and more.

Recent Posts:

  • Revolutionary War Narratives and Byrnside’s Fort
    I recently discovered additional Revolutionary War veteran pension applications mentioning Byrnside's Fort. These first-hand narratives, mostly from the 1830s, are the recollections of the 18th century frontier soldiers of the Greenbrier Valley. They're the best documentation we have on life and service on the Virginia frontier. They paint a good picture of the importance of Byrnside's Fort, as well as James Byrnside himself during the Revolutionary War era. There's strong evidence through these narratives that our fort was in active military use from around 1774 through 1782, which for the most part is the entire timeline of Lord Dunmore's War and the American Revolution. …
  • “Tub Mills” on the 18th Century Virginia Frontier
    When you travel in our southern mountains, one of the first things that will strike you is that about every fourth or fifth farmer has a tiny tub-mill of his own. Tiny is indeed the word, for there are few of these mills that can grind more than a bushel or two of corn in a day; some have a capacity of only half a bushel in ten hours of stead grinding. Red grains of corn being harder than white ones, it is a humorous saying in the mountains that "a red grain in the gryste (grist) will stop the mill." …
  • Tracking Down Logan’s War Club and Some Lost History
    But if we dig deeper, we find out that Logan's subsequent murder spree in Virginia included Logan leaving "calling cards" with the dead bodies - one of which survives today; and one of which uncovers what I think is a bit of lost history tied to my little county - Monroe County, West Virginia. …
  • French Trade Axes
    Most trade axes found on French influenced archaeological sites were manufactured in France. The sites where trade axes were found coincides exactly with the areas where French influence was felt : Saint-Lawrence valley, the Richelieu and the Lac Champlain region, the Great-Lakes region, south of the Mississippi, etc. In isolated cases, a few French style axes have been found on the east coast of the United States. Some east coast areas must have had provisional, or secondary, trade routes for the French trade goods. …
  • Encyclopedia of Marks found on French Fur Trade Axes
    A list of known marks on French Fur Trade Axes in the 17th and 18th centuries. …